Minding Frankie By Maeve Binchy

Minding Frankie By Maeve Binchy

 

Title: Minding Frankie

Author: Maeve Binchy

Original Language: 

Translator: 

ISBN 10: 

ISBN 13: 978-1-4091-1790-2

Language: English

Publisher: Orion

Genre/Subject: Novell, Fiction

Year Published: 2011

Number of Pages: 425

Dimensions (mm): 110*177*24

Shipping Weight (g): 200

Description: New York Times Bestseller

 

 

A tale of joy, heartbreak and hope, about a motherless girl collectively raised by a close-knit Dublin community.

Minding Frankie By Maeve Binchy

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Hornets Nest by Patricia Cornwell

Hornets Nest by Patricia Cornwell

 

 

Title: Hornets Nest

Author: Patricia Cornwell

Publisher: Werner books

Translator: N/A

Original language, title: English

Release date: 1997

Genre: Novel

ISBN10: 0 - 7515 - 2026 - 8

ISBN13:9 780751 520262

Language: English

Type: Pocket

Dimensions (mm): 177* 117 * 30

Numer of pages: 400

Weight(g):200g

 

Description

 

The gritty, heroic life of big-city police is seen through the eyes of three leading crimefighters from Charlotte, North Carolina--Police Chief Judy Hammer, Deputy Chief Virginia West, and ambitious young reporter Andy Brazil. By the author of Cruel and Unusual. Lit Guild, Doubleday, & Mystery Guild Main.

 

 

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The Window Ginger by Pip Granger

The Window Ginger by Pip Granger

Title: The Window Ginger       

Author: Pip Granger

Publisher: Corgi Books

translator: N/A      

Original language, title: The Window Ginger

Release date: 2003

Genre: Novel

ISBN10: 0 - 552 - 14896 - 2

ISBN13: 9 780552 148962

Language: English

Type: Pocket

Dimensions (mm): 177 * 150 * 26 mm

Number of pages: 400

Weight (g): 200g

 

 

Description

Life is starting to look up in the London cafe where Rosie lives with her beloved Aunt Maggie and Uncle Bert. It is 1954, rationing is over, and Roger Bannister's four-minute mile is the pride of England. But the Widow Ginger couldn't care less. An ex-GI with an ice-cold stare and fresh out of military prison, the Widow has come to settle some unfinished business with Bert. The Widow's looking for his share of the profits from a wartime scam'and a little vengeance for his years in the clink. Rosie soon learns that where there's smoke, there's fire, and it will take more than divine intervention to save the neighborhood'and Rosie's family'from the Widow's vengence. Charting the further misadventures of the characters from the acclaimed Not All Tarts Are Apple, Pip Granger's newest story of London's underworld shows her storytelling at its best.

 

 

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Are You Experienced? by William Sutcliffe

Are You Experienced by William Sutcliffe

Are You Experienced? by William Sutcliffe

Title: Are You Experienced?

Author: William Sutcliffe

ISBN 10: 0-14-027265-8

ISBN 13: 9780140272659

Language: English

Publisher: Penguin

Genre/Subject: Novel

Place of publication: UK

Year Published: 1998

Binding: Pocket

Number of Pages: 235

Dimensions (mm): 111 x 16 x 181 mm

Shipping Weight (g): 200

Description:

Liz travels to India because she wants to find herself. Dave travels to India because he wants to get Liz into bed. Liz loves India, hugs the beggars, and is well on her way to finding her tantric centre. Dave, however, realizes he hates Liz, and has bad karma toward his fellow travellers: Jeremy, whose spiritual journey is aided by checks from Dad; Jonah, who hasn't worn shoes for a decade; and Fee and Caz, fresh from leper-washing in Udaipur.
For anyone with the slightest curiosity about travelling, or even if you've been, William Sutcliffe's tremendously funny

Are You Experienced?  will have you in stitches. The protagonist is Dave, a 19-year-old Londoner on a gap year before starting university. He had no intention of leaving Europe, until his best mate James, who's about to go on a trek through the Himalayas, challenges him. "Do you want to learn Fwench David? Something pwactical for your CV?" he taunts when he hears Dave is going to be a waiter at a Swiss ski resort.
Admitting his fears, ("Suffering, danger and poverty are all fine by me, but dirt and disease are two things I happen to hate") Dave is determined to prove he's not a coward and accepts an invitation to go to India with James's girlfriend Liz (in anticipation of consummating their burgeoning relationship). But by the time they get on the plane it all goes downhill. Bickering constantly, their adaption to India couldn't be more different. Liz embraces it--hugging beggars and wearing saris, while Dave's dry-humoured rants, scepticism and fear of the unknown eventually drive her away in search of her "centre".
The characters the pair meet along the way draw upon all the old hippy-traveller stereotypes, but there's also a few new ones in keeping with the times. There's Ranj--a British-born Indian who hates Indians; Jez--a public-school-educated undergraduate whose travels are being funded by daddy; and Caz and Fee who experience the side-effects of "Intimate Yoga".
While this story is ultimately a funny piece of fiction, it also addresses more serious considerations, such as cultural stereotypes, peer pressures and making life-changing decisions.
This book is irresistible and seasoned travellers will empathise with the situations Dave finds himself in, (his graphic description of a bout of Dehli-belly is guaranteed to make you feel sorry for him, and nauseous too). Be prepared to laugh out loud. --Angela Boodoo

About the Author:

William Sutcliffe was born in London in 1971, and was educated at Cambridge. His first novel NEW BOY was published to enthusiastic reviews and a large amount of publicity in spring 1996.
He lives in London, N4.
An alumnus of Haberdashers' Aske's School, Sutcliffe started his career with a novel about school life entitled New Boy (1996), which was followed by his best-known work so far, Are You Experienced? (1997), a pre-university gap year novel, in which a group of young Brits travel to India without really knowing what to expect or what to do there. The Love Hexagon (2000) is about six young Londoners who have difficulty committing themselves to a relationship. Bad Influence (2004), is about Olly, a 10 year old growing up in a North London suburb with his family, and the plot centres around the complex knot of his childhood friendships. Sutcliffe's most recent book, Whatever Makes You Happy (2008), is about interfering mothers and men who refuse to grow up.  Sutcliffe's novels could be categorised as humorous. New Boy has much authentic material in it that refers to actual incidents from his life at Haberdashers', although it would be going too far to call it "autobiographical".  In 2009, he donated the short story Sandcastles: A Negotiation to Oxfam's 'Ox-Tales' project, four collections of UK stories written by 38 authors. Sutcliffe's story was published in the 'Fire' collection.

Pertinent URL:

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/apr/02/william-sutcliffe-interview-the-wall

 

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Are You Experienced by William Sutcliffe

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Pakistan by John King and David St Vincent

Item Name

Pakistan by John King and David St Vincent

Discusses the history and culture of Pakistan, describes the attractions in each region of the country, and provides practical information on accommodations, sources of information, and other travel essentials

Contains quirky tales of Pakistani culture, from the porno cinemas in Lahore to catching crabs in Karachi; complete details on excursions by jeep or steam train up the Khyber Pass; critical listings of all the best places to stay; and full information on getting there from China, Iran and India.

Product details

Series: Lonely Planet Pakistan

Paperback: 419 pages

Publisher: Lonely Planet; 4 edition (January 1, 1993)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 9780864421678

ISBN-13: 978-0864421678

ASIN: 0864421672

Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 7.2 inches (13.3 x 1.9 x 18.4 cm)

Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (340 g)

 

Note: The book is used.

Pakistan by John King and David St Vincent

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The Oxford Book of London by Paul Bailey

The Oxford Book of London by Paul Bailey

An excellent way to see London again through other's eyes 

With its hundreds of descriptions of the same city, Bailey's book is comparably eye-opening.

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The Oxford Book of London by Paul Bailey

Description:

All great cities inspire great literature, but no other city has so consistently stimulated the literary imagination as London. Over the centuries writers, poets, historians, artists, and simple observers have chronicled the life and growth of the capital from its humble beginnings to the teeming metropolis it is today. In his sparkling anthology Paul Bailey has captured the essence of its allure for visitors and inhabitants from the Middle Ages to the present day with wit, humour, and pathos. Among the many contributors are those whose evocations of the city have forever fixed it in the popular mind: Charles Dickens's descriptions of fog-bound London streets, the bustle and hustle of the Victorian city; Ben Jonson's satires on London low-life; William Wordsworth rhapsodizing on the view from Westminster Bridge; George Bernard Shaw's archetypal cockney, Eliza Doolittle...Less well known but equally vivid are descriptions of the down-and-out and the aristocrat, of the museums, theatres, galleries and churches, the restaurants and pubs, the parks and institutions, the topography of London mapped out in unforgettable verse and prose. The great set pieces - Daniel Defoe's description of the Plague year, John Evelyn's and Samuel Pepys's daily records of the Great Fire - are among several other eye-witness accounts of coronations and funerals, unequalled in their immediacy. The bemusement of foreign visitors, the joys and horrors of London buses and the London Underground, the sprawl of the suburbs and the excitement of the City, all add to the dazzling panorama. There could be no better introduction, and no better tribute to this fascinating city than The Oxford Book of London.

Title: The Oxford Book of London

Subtitle: A celebration of one of the world's greatest cities

Author: Paul Bailey (Editor)

ISBN 10: 0-19-283244-1

ISBN 13: 978-0192832443

Language: English

Publisher: Oxford University Press

Genre/Subject: London, Literary collection, Social life and customs, Description and travel

Place of publication: London

Year Published: April 17, 1997

Binding: Paperback

Number of Pages: 377 pages

Dimensions: 195 x 130 x 27 mm (5.1 x 1.1 x 7.7 inches)

Shipping Weight: 400 g (12 ounces)

Contents:

Introduction  xiii

Part I: The Twelfth Century to the Eighteenth Century  1

Part II: The Nineteenth Century  7

Part III: The Twentieth Century  231

Acknowledgements  367

Index of Authors  373

General Index  375

Review:

`an excellent way to see London again through other's eyes ... There are fascinating tit-bits in this anthology' Nine to Five, 25 September 1995

`With its hundreds of descriptions of the same city, Bailey's book is comparably eye-opening. Londoners will all find extracts that have special meaning for them and their locality.' John Carey, Sunday Times

`rich and conspicuous cornucopia ... It is the beautiful phrase, and immaculate observation, the record of a singular event that provide the vignettes of past life and people worth recalling that makes his book so enjoyable.' Gerald Isaaman, Ham and High (Hampstead and Highgate Express)

`Paul Bailey, has compiled a varied picture of the high life and the low life of the capital.' Andy Darley, Kilburn Times
`Paul Bailey, has compiled a varied picture of the high life and the low life of the capital.' Andy Darley, Camden and St Pancras Chronicle
`Paul Bailey, has compiled a varied picture of the high life and the low life of the capital.' Andy Darley, Willesden and Brent Chronicle
`Paul Bailey, has compiled a varied picture of the high life and the low life of the capital.' Andy Darley, Wembley and Brent Times
`Paul Bailey, has compiled a varied picture of the high life and the low life of the capital.' Andy Darley, Paddington Times
`The Oxford Book of London is both a pleasure and a welcome contribution to the debate over London. It is a model for anthologies on other major cities.' Steven Spier, Architects Journal --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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About the Editor:

Writer and broadcaster Paul Bailey was born on 16 February 1937.

He won a scholarship to the Central School of Speech and Drama in 1953 and worked as an actor between 1956 and 1964. He became a freelance writer in 1967.

He was appointed Literary Fellow at Newcastle and Durham Universities (1972-4), and was awarded a Bicentennial Fellowship in 1976, enabling him to travel to the USA, where he was Visiting Lecturer in English Literature at the North Dakota State University (1977-9). He was awarded the E.M. Forster Award in 1974 and in 1978 he won the George Orwell Prize for his essay 'The Limitations of Despair', first published in The Listener magazine. Paul Bailey's novels include At The Jerusalem (1967), which is set in an old people's home, and which won a Somerset Maugham Award and an Arts Council Writers' Award; Peter Smart's Confessions (1977) and Gabriel's Lament (1986), both shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction; and Sugar Cane (1993), a sequel to Gabriel's Lament. Kitty and Virgil (1998) is the story of the relationship between an Englishwoman and an exiled Romanian poet. In his last novel, Uncle Rudolf (2002), the narrator looks back on his colourful life and his rescue as a young boy from a likely death in fascist Romania, by his uncle, a gifted lyric tenor and the novel's eponymous hero.

He has also written plays for radio and television: At Cousin Henry's was broadcast in 1964 and his adaptation of Joe Ackerley's We Think the World of You was televised in 1980. His non-fiction books include two volumes of memoir, entitled An Immaculate Mistake: Scenes from Childhood and Beyond (1990), and A Dog's Life (2003). Three Queer Lives: An Alternative Biography of Naomi Jacob, Fred Barnes and Arthur Marshall (2001), is a biography of three gay popular entertainers from the twentieth century. His latest books are Chapman's Odyssey (2011) and The Prince's Boy (2014).

Read more on Paul Bailey on:

 

https://literature.britishcouncil.org/writer/paul-bailey